/   Sign Guestbook

 
Feeding & Bugs

Tree Frog Guide
  » Housing Tree Frogs
  » Daily Care
  » Feeding & Bugs
  » Frog Health
  » Common Questions
------------------------
Care Sheets
  » Click here...
------------------------

Tree Frog Guide

  » Housing Tree Frogs
  » Daily Care
  » Feeding & Bugs
  » Frog Health
  » Common Questions
------------------------

Articles
  » Click here...
------------------------

Message Boards
  » Questions & Answers...

------------------------

Photo Gallery
  » Click here...

------------------------

Feeding should happen in the evening or early night, since the frog should be awake and active by then.

The best and most recommended food is live crickets, which are available at most large pet stores.
Small frogs should be fed daily, averaging 12-18 crickets per week, or 2-4 crickets per feeding. A good rule for the size of crickets is for them to be smaller than the width of the frog's head.
Larger frogs can be fed larger crickets, daily or every other day.
All these numbers are very general and it comes down to the size and eating habits of your frog. Just keep a check on how fat he's getting as an indication of feeding (see below).

You should try and 'gut feed' the crickets by providing some fresh fruit, or preferably some pellet cricket food from the pet store. Remember that the frog always eats the last meal the cricket did. So adding some orange as food would give him Vitamin C in his crickets for example :)

Make sure to dust every few feedings of crickets with calcium/vitamin powder without phosphorus
This should be done much more regularly when feeding young frogs:
Put the crickets, and some of the powder in a plastic bag and shake to cover the crickets.
Then put the crickets in with the frog.
However, do not overdo the calcium as too much can be as bad as too little. Once a week should do fine.

White's will eat and eat and eat and can very easily get obese. Don't underfeed younger frogs, but cut down if your frog is getting a little to fat. The best way to tell is to look at the tympanic ridges (the "arches" above its eardrums). If the ridges are invisible, the frog is underweight; if they roll downward to cover the eardrums, it is probably overweight. In extreme cases, the tympanic ridges can grow to obscure the eyes; this occurs in conditions of severe obesity and should be viewed as an alarm.
Cuban Tree Frogs, can also grow very fat if overfed and so the same can apply.
 

Home | Tree Frog Guide | Care Sheets | Articles | Message Boards | Guestbook | Contact
Updated: 2/20/03
Copyright 200-2001 Matthew Ewers
Design By www.MattEwers.com